This Week

    • Larisa Shepitko

      Larisa Shepitko studied film at the Moscow Film Academy and the State Institute for Cinematography under famed director Alexander Dovzhenko. Her final school film Heat  (1963) was nearly her last, as she grew so ill due to bad weather that she had to be removed on a stretcher. Her fellow student, Elem Klimov helped her edit it. The film won several awards in Russia, and she and Klimov married after …

    • Kelly Reichardt

      Kelly Reichardt’s filmmaking career began in 1994 with her first feature River of Grass. The film was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival as well as three Independent Spirit Awards. Her follow up feature, Old Joy, premiered at Sundance in 2006 and was the first American film to win a Tiger Award at the Rotterdam Film Festival. Her next film, Wendy and Lucy (2008), appeared on …

    • Kirsten Johnson

      Kirsten Johnson’s Dick Johnson Is Dead premiered at this year’s 2020 Sundance and won the Jury Prize for Innovation in Nonfiction Storytelling. Her previous film, Cameraperson, named New York Times ‘Top Ten Films of 2016’ was shortlisted for the Academy Award and is part of The Criterion Collection. Her short, The Above was nominated for the IDA’s ‘Best Short Award’ for 2016. Her camerawork appears in Academy Award winner Citizenfour, Academy …

    • Věra Chytilová

      Věra Chytilová grew up amid the feverish experimentalism of the Prague arts world of the 1930s and survived both the war and Stalinism by the time she joined the avant-garde movement of feminist directors in the 1960s. At Charles University, she studied philosophy and architecture, before her career in modeling led her into the world of cinema. She enrolled in the Czech Film Academy and subsequently made a series of …

    • Maya Deren

      A pioneer in the American avant-garde filmmaking scene, Maya Deren is often referred to as the “mother of the Underground film.” A choreographer and dancer, in the early 1920s Deren intended to write a book about dance. While accompanying Katherine Dunham on a national tour, she met Czech documentarian Alexander Hammid, who became her second husband. Deren’s first short, the surrealistic Meshes of the Afternoon (1943), became a landmark in …

    • Alethea Arnaquq-Baril

      One of the most significant champions of Inuit culture, producer-director-writer Alethea Arnaquq-Baril is the founder of Unikkaat Studios, based in Iqaluit, Nunavut Territory, Canada. She was born in Iqaluit and initially pursued a career in video game design. Her interest in storytelling led to filmmaking as a way of preserving the great Inuit stories, leading to her producing debut with the documentary James Huston: The Most Interesting Group of People …

    • Marie-Louise Iribe

      Born in Paris, Marie-Louise Iribe is considered one of the early pioneers of cinema in France. Her career began as an actress in a series of short films in the early 1910s, including two films by Louis Feuillade in 1914 – Her Guilty Secret and At the Hour of Dawn. In the 1920s she continued to act in films and co-founded the Les Artistes Réunis production company with her husband, …